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Dungeon Chatter RPG Podcast

On Friday, August 24th, we'll launch the first few episodes of the Dungeon Chatter Podcast. The podcast covers table top RPG (TTRPG) creation and game play, with the hosts tackling a new topic each week. As the podcast progresses, the hosts are actually creating a game, adding flesh to the bare bones of the system with each passing week. Each episode includes an introduction to the topic at hand, a preview of how various games address the topic, stories from favorite RPG sessions, a pitch for how to handle the topic in the Blood of Heroes RPG. The final piece is a "Hack and Slash" portion in which the co-host presses concerns and challenges to be addressed by the Blood of Heroes pitch.

Episode Preview:
Episode 1: A is for Armor
Episode 2: B is for Blood of Heroes
Episode 3: C is for Character Creation

Tune in to your hosts Travis and Victoria, or catch us on Twitter @DungeonChatter.

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